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First Impressions Are Forever

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As we search for that singular thing that defines our industry — be it suppliers, training technicians, safety in the field, new technology, family businesses, the OEMs, entrepreneurs, the next generation or even social media — sometimes we forget the real thing that illuminates every industry: People! This month, we honor the people you have nominated who mentored, built and improved the elevator industry in our time. We could not use every nomination that came in due to space and time constraints, but this feature will be back, because the stories are just too good to hide.

The people in this section made a lasting impression on those who nominated them. Of the 30 people in the section, I know only about a third. That means two-thirds are strangers (to me), but they made a lasting impression on others in the industry and I will be looking forward to meeting them. Some have been in the industry for a very long time — John Inglis, 76 years, but Volodymyr Sharovar, only two — proving that impressions are not based on length of service. Nominees come from all over the world: Egypt to Mumbai; Australia to the Bronx; Seattle to Rocky Mount, North Carolina; Palm Beach to Pune, India; and California to Wisconsin, proving there are good people in this industry everywhere. It is said that we are an industry in which you have to know someone in the family to get into it, but there are only a few famous family industry names in the group — Glaser, Lloyd, Shrum and Randle. So, what ties all these amazing people together? They made a positive impression on those who nominated them, and we hope they will do the same for you.

Our focus topic this month is Cabs and Cab Aesthetics. What is your impression of a building if the elevator in the lobby is dirty or damaged? In Pre-Engineered Opportunities, Bill Swenson says that cab interiors are the first impression by tenants of a building’s care and maintenance. Building managers view the visual as important as the function. The author presents a system of pre-engineered cab interiors. In Canton Expands Cab Offerings, Canton Architectural Products, an adjunct of Canton Elevator, offers a wide array of colors to match building interiors, plus specialized cabs for high-traffic demands. Our Continuing Education article this month, worth 1 contact hour, focuses on Carriage Gates by Graham Kawulka. The author highlights the history and evolution of car doors and gates on residential elevators, with emphasis on code issues and safety. In Clear Vision for the Future, new SnapCab President Corinna Mossberg talks with ELEVATOR WORLD’s Kaija Wilkinson about how the company is evolving with Corning® Gorilla® Glass. Elevating Architecture tells the origin of Elevecture, a company that originated in National Elevator Cab & Door Corp. and was formed by the owner’s daughter, Lianne Friedman. Elevecture aims to revolutionize cab and building interiors using Gorilla Glass. Samson Babu, a consultant with VTME Vertical Transportation Systems Consultants in Dubai, has written an extensive article on Elevator Cab Decoration Planning Issues. The author elaborates on the recommended practices for decorating cabs and entrances, while coordinating various code issues. Tips include lighting, panels, ventilation flooring and much more. Finally, my favorite: Where No Man (or Elevator Cab) Has Gone Before written by Dr. Lee Gray. Gray investigates the futuristic elevators in Star Trek. Called “turbo-elevators” or “turbo-lifts,” they moved vertically and horizontally (a premonition of thyssenkrupp’s MULTI?) and obeyed voice commands from the captain.

All this talk of first impressions reminds me that I have a new iPhone X with “facial recognition.” It works great — except first thing in the morning or on the weekends when I don’t have on makeup! I guess I made a good first impression, but after that, not so much!

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Elevator World | June 2018 Cover

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Elevator World | June 2018 Cover

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