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Pixel Technologies Systems Improve Maintenance Response Times, Enhance Safety

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The LMS screen at a central monitoring station shows green for Standard Mode (normal operation).

Australian company offers fully scalable means for tracking elevators and emergency communications.

Australia-based Pixel Technologies offers clients solutions for remotely monitoring their elevators, escalators and emergency-communications systems. The benefits provided by these systems includes improved response times for both maintenance and emergency situations.

LMS

The Pixel Elevator Monitoring System (LMS) allows facilities managers and building owners to analyze and monitor the functioning of elevators and escalators. Using specialized hardware, the system allows real-time monitoring by collecting data and transmitting it over an Ethernet- or Internet-based network to an LMS computer. A suite of software allows a user to see the status of all monitored devices and generate reports based on collected data. LMS can accurately record the occurrence, time and date of various events, which allows for the logging and reporting of elevator breakdowns and availability. Instant reporting by email ensures any alert event can be investigated and corrective action put in place. This can also reduce elevator service provider callouts, saving time and money. The change of status to normal operation will also be reported by email.

LMS is easy to install using local area network (LAN) cabling with no set limits to the monitored equipment. Each input can be customized, and all inputs have real-time monitoring. Faults are identified as red for “emergency” and yellow for “warning.” The elevator position indicator, direction and messages are transferred using Pixel’s elevator data collectors, which can be interfaced to all brands of elevators and escalators. These attributes make Pixel’s LMS a powerful, independent way to save time in maintenance checks and ensure the safety of elevator and escalator users.

LMS has shown itself to be capable in large-scale implementations in Australia. For example, the Victoria Department of Human Services (DHS) employs Pixel’s LMS in about 150 elevators in housing facilities across the state. The elevators are all networked over a virtual private network (VPN) to a central monitoring base. Here, DHS personnel maintain live, full-time access to the status and position of all elevators. LMS is also used by New South Wales State Rail to monitor elevators and escalators at its stations. LMS data is transmitted to a central control room for 24/7 real-time monitoring, allowing quick response to any faults or emergencies at the stations. Further north in Queensland, two of the state’s largest universities are using LMS to, eventually, monitor up to 250 elevators.

Pixel Telecommunications Monitoring

Finding yourself stuck in a stalled elevator can be an irritating situation, but annoyance can quickly turn to panic if the emergency-communications system is not working. Is help on the way? Does anyone even know that the elevator has broken down? For the building owner or facilities manager, the answer to these questions should always be “yes.” With Pixel Monitoring, round-the-clock oversight means an end to guesswork.

Pixel Telecommunications Monitoring provides 24/7 monitoring of elevator communications through a cellular wireless gateway that allows the user to track network status, faults and reports. You can monitor network uptime and downtime, and group data by carrier, state or city. Alarms can be monitored by text message, email or the Pixel Dashboard running on any browser. There is no limit to the number of connected units, and hosting capabilities are through structured query language database, local, cloud or Pixel. The system monitors a “heartbeat” from each unit at regular intervals, using less than 50 MB of data per unit, per month. It complies with EN 81 alarm acknowledgement, with callout and response time options.

Pixel Telecommunications Monitoring will alert the user for:

  • Mains power outage to the unit
  • Low-battery status
  • Loss of primary or backup Network
  • Any loss in signal strength of the cellular network
  • Emergency calls being made from elevators
  • “All OK” (connection restored)
  • Map-based location of units
  • Reports on breakdown percentages
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