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Denmark, Sweden to get high rises

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Gasklockan, a 90-m-tall residential tower, is set to rise in Stockholm, Sweden; rendering by Herzog & de Meuron.

Architecture firm Herzog & de Meuron has designed its first building in Sweden, a 90-m-tall residential structure in Stockholm that World Architecture News said in May “will simmer with life and public activities.” The development, known as Gasklockan, will replace a 1930s industrial structure of the same height. The tower will be generally round but include protruding V-shaped arms, each “V” housing an apartment on each level, with 317 units in all. The design is meant to maximize the amount of natural light in the apartments, which are afforded far-reaching views of the city. The ground floor includes a grand entrance “in the form of an enormous atrium,” said Oscar Engelbert, founder and CEO of developer Oscar Properties. In addition, the bottom level will house a deli restaurant, office space and areas for curated exhibitions. Other amenities include a built-in digital platform that offers resident services, a gym, a spa and a playroom.

Gasklockan is part of a redevelopment of the Stockholm Royal Seaport, northern Europe’s largest urban development, which is bringing 12,000 homes and 25,000 workplaces to an area with easy metro access to the city center. Construction of the tower is expected to begin by the end of the year, and it should be move-in ready in 2022.

Denmark’s Tallest Residential Building to Take Shape

Danish engineering firm Ramboll has announced the team that will deliver Denmark’s tallest residential building, a 44-story tower on the harbor in Aarhus that will form the second phase of Lighthouse, an existing low-rise residential development. Architects 3XN, which designed Lighthouse, drew inspiration for the façade from the light reflected on the surrounding water. The team will use a foundation that addresses ground-condition challenges and enables an additional four floors. In a departure from traditional Danish precast concrete, traditional reinforced concrete will be used, allowing for a “shorter build time and lighter superstructure.” Norcap is the developer, and Aarsleff is the general contractor. Construction is expected to start this year and be complete by 2021

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